"Alice is gentle, kind, appreciative while also quietly insistent on attention and the best the student can do."
- Jean Hooker, grandmother to Ursula (4)

Alice strikes a happy balance between valuing and appreciating what the student can now do, and asking for the next level. Ursula feels totally accepted, respected and validated. She likes a new challenge.
 
Alice is gentle, kind, appreciative while also quietly insistent on attention and the best the student can do. She readily incorporates the child's interests and remembers the many names Ursula offers like "Lachie, Ursula and Emily" for fingers 1, 2, 3 on the tapes in Twinkle. Ursula would love to engage in conversations about many fanciful topics, and Alice gently steers her back to the lesson with mild statements like "We could talk about that after the lesson".
 
Lessons have an engaging combination of expected elements and novel items. We've enjoyed throwing the dice to decide how often to practise an element; drawing out of a hat which elements they will practise. There are many techniques to help young students develop the strength and coordination to master the complexity of bow and violin hands.
 
I also feel well-supported as the person who helps Ursula practise at home. Alice shares information and approaches from the Suzuki method and encourages a high level of parent involvement.
 
A significant endorsement: Ursula likes Mrs Painter and is comfortable and happy working with her.